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#fireisland: The Best Kept Secret

by FIN |

The fickle surf, plus the commitment of a ferry ride, keeps the crew here quite local, tightly knit, and super friendly. That part of the equation is amazing and unique to Fire Island. Other beaches see crowds in the hundreds vying for the same waves. Here a packed day in any given lineup is maybe seven to 10 people. And if that’s too many then just paddle over to the next sandbar.

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Interview: Jillian Weinstein

by FIN |

Jillian Weinstein is a longtime summer resident of Fire Island who began lifeguarding in 2007. This year, she was named the first female chief lifeguard in the 100-year history of Ocean Beach.

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Fire Island National Seashore Names New Chief Ranger

by FIN |

After a lengthy interview process, Fire Island National Seashore (FINS) has announced that Erik Westpfahl has been named as new Chief of Visitor and Resource Protection. He will begin his new position in September. He brings more than 20 years of law enforcement, emergency services, and resource protection experience to Fire Island.

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Kevin Lowry: From Thief to Chief

by FIN |

Kevin Lowry, an Ocean Beach resident of 17 years, held a book signing at The Landing at Ocean Beach on Aug. 12, for his new book, “From Thief to Chief,” which was released on Dec. 24, 2020. The story takes readers through Lowry’s life journey, which had turbulent beginnings.

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OP-ED: Keeping Our Kids Safe Online This Summer

by FIN |

There is a perception that our youngsters are “digital natives” and know more about how to navigate the world of social media than we do. That’s true but only up to a point. Our kids have grown up with phones and tablets in their hands since they could sit up so they know how to surf the web and make cute dance videos on TikTok but that doesn’t mean they understand how to spot misinformation.

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Balloon Disconnect Remains After Passage of Recent Laws

by FIN |

“It is not unusual at all for a balloon that might be released in, for example, Central Pennsylvania to get caught up in strong winds and be transported dozens or more likely hundreds of miles and then ultimately landing in the Atlantic Ocean off of Long Island and wreaking havoc to the animals there,” Turner said.